American history

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Donna F. Johnson
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
2
Elementary (K-5)

In this module, students will conduct research, read, and learn how Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. impacted history and why he was considered a great American Leader. Then they will write an informative article with an opening paragraph, body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph describing why...

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Jan Powell
Brian Sirmans
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
9, 10, 11
High (9-12)

The focus of this module is the Jacksonian Democracy period. Andrew Jackson was in some eyes a military dictator. Students will decide if he used his executive power to be a dictator or if he really contributed to the growth of the nation. Content in this module is a portion of a unit on...

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Linda L. Crocker
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
Other
4
Elementary (K-5)

In this module, the Gold Rush time period in American History will be analyzed through the lens of the economic concepts of choice, opportunity cost, and positive and negative incentives. 

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Vivian Masket
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
Other
11
High (9-12)

This module serves as a case study within Unit 1 in the high school Civics course and focuses on these essential questions: "How did the founding of the U.S. government reflect the founders’ beliefs about power and authority? Does our current government still reflect these same beliefs?" The...

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Joseph A. Hunt
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
Other
10, 11
High (9-12)

After declaring its independence from Great Britain on July 4th, 1776 the young nation was forced to decide which type of government it would call its own. The Articles of Confederation represented the first constitutional agreement made between the 13 American states. However, after the...

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Misty L. Dilback
0
No votes yet
English / Language Arts
11
High (9-12)
  • After reading and analyzing foundational American texts, student will brainstorm, research, discuss, and take a position on an issue in contemporary society relating to the rights of "life, liberty, or the pursuit of happiness". 
Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Justin R. Bailey
Susan Weston
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
U.S. History
6, 7, 8
Middle (6-8)

On July 5, 1852, former slave and abolitionist Frederick Douglass delivered what was to become one of the most historic speeches of the 19th century at an Independence Day commemoration sponsored by the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society in Rochester, NY.

In this module, students will...

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Pier Sun Ho
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
U.S. History
11
High (9-12)

The Civil Right Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 are considered the most important civil rights legislation since the end of the Civil War. They arose from courtrooms, executive actions, and prior legislation, but also from sit-ins, boycotts, and civic organizing with a message that...

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Chris Crouch
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
U.S. History
9, 10
High (9-12)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s most famous speech makes a distinctive argument for equal treatment of men and women. Reading major excerpts, students will trace that argument, gaining direct insight into Stanton’s thought and her approach. The speech embodies 19th century concern for individual...

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Chris Crouch
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
U.S. History
11, 12
High (9-12)

President Roosevelt’s “date that will live in infamy” speech is short, clear, and powerful, conveying a giant turn of historical events in a text every student should engage. Using the question of what FDR chose to say and not say in his address to Congress, this module engages the full run-up...

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Rachel McCormick
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
U.S. History
9, 10, 11, 12
High (9-12)

FDR’s first Fireside Chat had a palpable impact on public understanding and confidence in the U.S. banking system, combining information, argumentation, style, tone and the potent new medium of radio broadcasts to create a powerful shift in American public events and private economic choices....

Curriculum Embedded Task
Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC)
Rachel McCormick
Stephanie Schneider
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
U.S. History
11, 12
High (9-12)

Students use primary documents that include Senate speeches, newspaper opinion pieces, and Presidential speeches, students explore to American Imperialism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This module is designed for a deep dive into key primary texts from a major debate in U.S. History...

Stand Alone Task
Summit Public Schools
0
No votes yet
History / Social Studies
U.S. History
11
High (9-12)

Students write an essay based on the information they have learned about the American Revolution and the period leading up to it.

Students choose to respond to one of the following prompts.​

  1. “Despite the view of some historians that the conflict between Great Britain and its
  2. ...